Intimidating oxford dictionary


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Immanuel Kant defines “enlightenment” in his famous contribution to debate on the question in an essay entitled “An Answer to the Question: What is Enlightenment?

” (1784), as humankind’s release from its self-incurred immaturity; “immaturity is the inability to use one’s own understanding without the guidance of another.” Expressing convictions shared among Enlightenment thinkers of widely divergent doctrines, Kant identifies enlightenment with the process of undertaking to think for oneself, to employ and rely on one’s own intellectual capacities in determining what to believe and how to act.

The energy created and expressed by the intellectual foment of Enlightenment thinkers contributes to the growing wave of social unrest in France in the eighteenth century.

The social unrest comes to a head in the violent political upheaval which sweeps away the traditionally and hierarchically structured a new reason-based order instituting the Enlightenment ideals of liberty and equality.

However, there are noteworthy centers of Enlightenment outside of France as well.